Heavier Than Air Gallery
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Heavier Than Air was created to mark the 100th anniversary of powered flight. First shown in the Collins Gallery, Strathclyde University before going on tour... it ended
in the unused Clydebank Baths which were converted for the show.

Illustrated below are examples of the installation . Images can be mouse-clicked to enlarge and the gallery can be navigated by placing your mouse over these images.

About the exhibition paintings
The artist as a child, like many of his generation, was fascinated by Airfix Kits. "The box illustration was always a full colour dynamic image of aviation action.
Opening the box was disappointment, gray plastic components neatly layed out on sprues, but in the mind of the child there was the potential to create. The results
were usually tragic or at best grossly inadequate. Inverting the idea, the artist has taken images of real aircraft, dismantled them, reassembled them in kit
form placing them back in their box. Presented in this manner the surfaces can be examined in detail, the form and shape explored.

There is however irony in these images. Displayed in all their aesthetic beauty, form and splendour, these aircraft were designed as killing machines...that was their
purpose...yet they are at the same time toys.
About the exhibition sculptures

The Formation .....Dominating the exhibition, a group of seven sculptures create a v formation... a laser points their direction of travel. They are sculptures of aircraft
yet they have no flying surfaces. Powerful engines turning huge propellers dwarf the pilots who sit behind them, reminding us that aviation was driven by conflict.
and the need to carry heavier destructive loads over greater distances drove the demand for more powerful and sophisticated engines.

The Guardians....Surrounding the Formation are six ball turrets. Each turret is powered and is designed to follow the viewer as they walk around the exhibit. The artist was
fascinated by the contradictions of this object. In the ball turret we have a lethal mechanism, yet its operator is curled in foetal position, exposed and vulnerable in his role
as protector.

The Bomber... This sculpture uses an analogy of the altar and religious symbolism. A Lancaster Bomber is turned on its side and displayed against a triptych of a burning
city viewed from above. Gaping bomb bay doors running almost the length of the aircraft hint at purpose and load. The cavernous bay is empty, a lethal gargo has been
discharged. Far below we see the results. Western religion has historically looked to the heavens for salvation for many it has been the source of hell.

The All American Big Tin Candy Bomber....designed to dump upon the Vietnamese an unoppressive payload of sherbet rockets and soft toys. A parody to the 'Candy Bombers'
of ww11 which dropped gifts of food and sweets upon the destitute of German bombed cities.

The Last Smile of Lieutenant Kanno Naoshi...Kanno was a Japanese ace with 48 kills to his credit. On his last flight he engaged the enemy B-24s; damaged and
outnumbered, his wingmen tried to persuade him to follow them back to base. Kanno refused, smiled at them, and although he did not engage with the B-24s whilst still in
his wingmen's sight he was never seen again. In McKendrick's version he is still flying fifty years later, his Zero discoloured, the smile still fixed upon his face, the perfect
enemy not yet found. He is considered by many to be the first Kamikaze.

Albatros D.Va Dismantled
Albatros D.Va Dismantled
Albatros Dismantled
Albatros Dismantled
Camel Dismantled
Camel Dismantled
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